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Forthcoming lectures

Sanskrit Prelims: Session one

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Monday, 23 April 2018 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper of the Theology and Religion Faculty in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology and Religion to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Chāndogya-upaniṣad, the Bhagavad-gītā and passages from other texts such as the Buddhist Heart Sūtra (Prajñāpāramitāhṛdayasūtra). The course book will be Maurer’s The Sanskrit Language. This course is a continuation from the Sanskrit Prelims course started in Michaelmas Term 2017.

Week 1. Is language eternal? The Mīmāṃsā theory of an objective word-referent relation

Graduate Seminars in Indian Philosophy
Dr Jan Westerhoff
Wednesday, 25 April 2018 -
9:00am to 10:30am
Faculty of Philosophy, Radcliffe Humanities

Readings in Phenomenology: Week one

Prof. Gavin Flood
Thursday, 26 April 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
OCHS Library

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century, and it has also had a deep impact on other theoretical fields more widely conceived. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology, and has turned in the past to thinkers such as Martin Heidegger, Paul Ricoeur, Emmanuel Levinas, Peter Sloterdijk, Quentin Meillassoux, and others.

Sanskrit Prelims: Session one

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Friday, 27 April 2018 -
11:00am to 1:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper of the Theology and Religion Faculty in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology and Religion to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Chāndogya-upaniṣad, the Bhagavad-gītā and passages from other texts such as the Buddhist Heart Sūtra (Prajñāpāramitāhṛdayasūtra). The course book will be Maurer’s The Sanskrit Language. This course is a continuation from the Sanskrit Prelims course started in Michaelmas Term 2017.

Sanskrit Prelims: Session two

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Monday, 30 April 2018 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper of the Theology and Religion Faculty in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology and Religion to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Chāndogya-upaniṣad, the Bhagavad-gītā and passages from other texts such as the Buddhist Heart Sūtra (Prajñāpāramitāhṛdayasūtra). The course book will be Maurer’s The Sanskrit Language. This course is a continuation from the Sanskrit Prelims course started in Michaelmas Term 2017.

Week 2. Do persons exist? The ancient Indian controversy about the existence of an ātman.

Graduate Seminars in Indian Philosophy
Dr Jan Westerhoff
Wednesday, 2 May 2018 -
9:00am to 10:30am
Faculty of Philosophy, Radcliffe Humanities

Readings in Phenomenology: Week two

Prof. Gavin Flood
Thursday, 3 May 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
OCHS Library

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century, and it has also had a deep impact on other theoretical fields more widely conceived. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology, and has turned in the past to thinkers such as Martin Heidegger, Paul Ricoeur, Emmanuel Levinas, Peter Sloterdijk, Quentin Meillassoux, and others.

Sanskrit Prelims: Session two

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Friday, 4 May 2018 -
11:00am to 1:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper of the Theology and Religion Faculty in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology and Religion to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Chāndogya-upaniṣad, the Bhagavad-gītā and passages from other texts such as the Buddhist Heart Sūtra (Prajñāpāramitāhṛdayasūtra). The course book will be Maurer’s The Sanskrit Language. This course is a continuation from the Sanskrit Prelims course started in Michaelmas Term 2017.

Sanskrit Prelims: Session three

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Monday, 7 May 2018 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper of the Theology and Religion Faculty in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology and Religion to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Chāndogya-upaniṣad, the Bhagavad-gītā and passages from other texts such as the Buddhist Heart Sūtra (Prajñāpāramitāhṛdayasūtra). The course book will be Maurer’s The Sanskrit Language. This course is a continuation from the Sanskrit Prelims course started in Michaelmas Term 2017.

Week 3. Is there a nature of the world? Madhyamaka's radical anti-foundationalism

Graduate Seminars in Indian Philosophy
Dr Jan Westerhoff
Wednesday, 9 May 2018 -
9:00am to 10:30am
Faculty of Philosophy, Radcliffe Humanities

Readings in Phenomenology: Week three

Prof. Gavin Flood
Thursday, 10 May 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
OCHS Library

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century, and it has also had a deep impact on other theoretical fields more widely conceived. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology, and has turned in the past to thinkers such as Martin Heidegger, Paul Ricoeur, Emmanuel Levinas, Peter Sloterdijk, Quentin Meillassoux, and others.

A Persistence of Vision: The Development and Spread of Illustration of the Bhāgavata Purāṇa in North India from the 16th to the 18th Century

Lecture of the J.P. And Beena Khaitan Visiting Fellow
Prof. Daniel Ehnbom
Thursday, 10 May 2018 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
OCHS Library

There is a long tradition of depicting the story of Kṛṣṇa in sculpture dating at least from the Gupta Period (4th-6th centuries CE). The compositions are quite consistent over time and place, and, with only a few exceptions, are simple and straightforward.

In the early 16th century, coinciding with a great revival of Kṛṣṇa worship, the earliest surviving painted Bhāgavata Purāṇa illustrations appear (c. 1520-30), and, though not unrelated to the earlier examples, the compositions are strikingly lively and inventive. The lecture examines this development, offers speculation on a possible source, and considers the long influence of this new compositional tradition on subsequent Indian painting.

Daniel Ehnbom is Associate Professor at the McIntire Department of Art of the University of Virginia. He is the author of Indian Miniatures: The Ehrenfeld Collection (1985), articles on painting and Indian architecture, and contributions to various exhibition catalogues. He was with the Macmillan/Grove Dictionary of Art (1996) in London as a contributor and consultant from 1984 and as South Asia Area Editor for Painting and Sculpture from 1988. His recent publications include Realms of Earth and Sky: Indian Painting from the Fifteenth to the Nineteenth Century (Charlottesville: The Fralin Art Museum at the University of Virginia, 2014).

Sanskrit Prelims: Session three

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Friday, 11 May 2018 -
11:00am to 1:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper of the Theology and Religion Faculty in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology and Religion to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Chāndogya-upaniṣad, the Bhagavad-gītā and passages from other texts such as the Buddhist Heart Sūtra (Prajñāpāramitāhṛdayasūtra). The course book will be Maurer’s The Sanskrit Language. This course is a continuation from the Sanskrit Prelims course started in Michaelmas Term 2017.

Sanskrit Prelims: Session four

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Monday, 14 May 2018 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper of the Theology and Religion Faculty in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology and Religion to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Chāndogya-upaniṣad, the Bhagavad-gītā and passages from other texts such as the Buddhist Heart Sūtra (Prajñāpāramitāhṛdayasūtra). The course book will be Maurer’s The Sanskrit Language. This course is a continuation from the Sanskrit Prelims course started in Michaelmas Term 2017.

Week 4. Does matter exist? The Yogācāra denial of the external world

Graduate Seminars in Indian Philosophy
Dr Jan Westerhoff
Wednesday, 16 May 2018 -
9:00am to 10:30am
Faculty of Philosophy, Radcliffe Humanities

Readings in Phenomenology: Week four

Prof. Gavin Flood
Thursday, 17 May 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
OCHS Library

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century, and it has also had a deep impact on other theoretical fields more widely conceived. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology, and has turned in the past to thinkers such as Martin Heidegger, Paul Ricoeur, Emmanuel Levinas, Peter Sloterdijk, Quentin Meillassoux, and others.

Sanskrit Prelims: Session four

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Friday, 18 May 2018 -
11:00am to 1:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper of the Theology and Religion Faculty in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology and Religion to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Chāndogya-upaniṣad, the Bhagavad-gītā and passages from other texts such as the Buddhist Heart Sūtra (Prajñāpāramitāhṛdayasūtra). The course book will be Maurer’s The Sanskrit Language. This course is a continuation from the Sanskrit Prelims course started in Michaelmas Term 2017.

Week 5. What is consciousness? Mind, reason, and phenomenology in Vedānta and Sāṃkhya

Graduate Seminars in Indian Philosophy
Dr Jessica Frazier
Wednesday, 23 May 2018 -
9:00am to 10:30am
Faculty of Philosophy, Radcliffe Humanities

Readings in Phenomenology: Week five

Prof. Gavin Flood
Thursday, 24 May 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
OCHS Library

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century, and it has also had a deep impact on other theoretical fields more widely conceived. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology, and has turned in the past to thinkers such as Martin Heidegger, Paul Ricoeur, Emmanuel Levinas, Peter Sloterdijk, Quentin Meillassoux, and others.

Week 6. What is identity or essence? Attributes, Modes, and Meaning in Parināma-vāda

Graduate Seminars in Indian Philosophy
Dr Jessica Frazier
Wednesday, 30 May 2018 -
9:00am to 10:30am
Faculty of Philosophy, Radcliffe Humanities

Readings in Phenomenology: Week six

Prof. Gavin Flood
Thursday, 31 May 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
OCHS Library

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century, and it has also had a deep impact on other theoretical fields more widely conceived. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology, and has turned in the past to thinkers such as Martin Heidegger, Paul Ricoeur, Emmanuel Levinas, Peter Sloterdijk, Quentin Meillassoux, and others.

Battle of the Gods: A Comparative Study of Narrative Techniques in Nepali Painting

Lecture of the Shivdasani Visiting Fellow
Dr Neeraja Poddar
Thursday, 31 May 2018 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
OCHS Library

While exploring the collections at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA), I was struck by four dazzling illustrations where splendid architecture and dramatic landscapes in rainbow colours serve as backdrops as Krishna hunts, marries beautiful princesses, and engages in combat. The depicted episodes from the Latter Half of the Tenth Book of the Bhāgavata Purāṇa were familiar to me from illustrations produced at the Rajput courts, in the Punjab hills, and in Central India. But here, Krishna had been transposed into the rich and brilliant world of Nepali paintings and occupied the cities and palaces of the Kathmandu valley, his presence bearing testimony to the wide sphere of the Bhāgavata’s circulation and influence.

The four PMA illustrations and the lavish Nepali manuscript to which they belong have never been studied in detail. This is despite the long history of Vaishnavism in Nepal, the ubiquity of artworks dedicated to Vishnu and his incarnations, and the manuscript’s participation in a broader North Indian engagement with the Krishna legend. Moreover, the manuscript is visually spectacular and a singular example in Nepal’s canon. In this talk, I will examine the manuscript’s depiction of the “battle of the gods” between Krishna and Shiva alongside a Nepali scroll that portrays the Harivaṃśa’s version of the encounter. By comparing arrangement of text and image, visualization of space and place, storytelling techniques and style, I will probe how the manuscript’s organization and narrative rhythm derive at least partially from the features it shares with contemporary Hindu (and Buddhist) scrolls. My larger goal is to prompt a revision of the dominant narrative of Himalayan art where “Himalayan” is seen as synonymous with Tibetan Buddhist art; such a characterization fails to account for Nepal’s rich canon of Hindu-themed works and its entangled socio-cultural history where deities, religious practices and artistic styles are shared between Hinduism and Buddhism.

Dr. Neeraja Poddar received her Ph.D. in Art History from Columbia University. She was the Andrew W. Mellon—Anne d’Harnoncourt Postdoctoral Fellow in South Asian Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and is now Curator at The City Palace Museum, Udaipur. Poddar’s publications and research focus broadly on South Asian illustrated manuscripts; she is particularly interested in the materiality of books, the relationships between text and image and the transmission and circulation of narratives. She also studies the painting traditions of Nepal with particular emphasis on Vaiṣṇava imagery. Poddar co-curated the reinstallation of the South Asian galleries at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. She is currently working on a book project related to illustrated manuscripts of the Bhāgavata Purāṇa as well as a catalogue of The City Palace Museum, Udaipur's silver collection.

Week 7. Is there a 'Fundamental Ontology'? Being and change in Vedānta

Graduate Seminars in Indian Philosophy
Dr Jessica Frazier
Wednesday, 6 June 2018 -
9:00am to 10:30am
Faculty of Philosophy, Radcliffe Humanities

Readings in Phenomenology: Week seven

Prof. Gavin Flood
Thursday, 7 June 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
OCHS Library

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century, and it has also had a deep impact on other theoretical fields more widely conceived. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology, and has turned in the past to thinkers such as Martin Heidegger, Paul Ricoeur, Emmanuel Levinas, Peter Sloterdijk, Quentin Meillassoux, and others.

Week 8. What is value? Natural Law and Affective Judgement in Dharma and Nāṭya Śāstras

Graduate Seminars in Indian Philosophy
Dr Jessica Frazier
Wednesday, 13 June 2018 -
9:00am to 10:30am
Faculty of Philosophy, Radcliffe Humanities

Readings in Phenomenology: Week eight

Prof. Gavin Flood
Thursday, 14 June 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
OCHS Library

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century, and it has also had a deep impact on other theoretical fields more widely conceived. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology, and has turned in the past to thinkers such as Martin Heidegger, Paul Ricoeur, Emmanuel Levinas, Peter Sloterdijk, Quentin Meillassoux, and others.