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Forthcoming lectures

Sanskrit Prelims I: Session six

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Monday, 18 November 2019 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper of the Theology and Religion Faculty in Elementary Sanskrit. A range of relevant Hindu and Buddhist texts will be chosen for translation and philological comment. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology and Religion to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary and its importance for the exegesis of Sanskrit texts. Students will learn to appreciate the interpretative nature of translation as a central discipline for the study of religions.
By the end of the course students will have gained a basic competency in translating classical Sanskrit and reading relevant passages from texts such as the Chāndogya Upaniṣad, the Bhagavadgītā and the Buddhist Heart Sūtra. The course book will be Walter Maurer’s The Sanskrit Language. Sanskrit Prelims continues throughout Michaelmas and Hilary Terms and for the first four weeks of Trinity.

Pāli for Sanskritists: Session six

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Monday, 18 November 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Pāli Buddhist texts for students with prior knowledge of Sanskrit (e.g. Sanskrit Prelims). We will read classical Theravāda Buddhist discourses from the Pāli Canon such as the Fire Sermon (Ādittapariyāya-sutta) and Dependent Origination (Paṭiccasamuppāda) providing an easy philological introduction to the Pāli language via Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce to the essentials of Pali grammar and vocabulary with a focus on key terms and their importance for the exegesis of Buddhist texts. The course will contribute to an appreciation of the interpretative nature of translation as a central discipline for the study of religions. The course book will be Dines Andersen’s A Pāli Reader supplementet with Rune E.A. Johansson’s Pali Buddhist Texts: An Introductory Reader and Grammar.

Readings in Vedānta: Bhedābheda Vedānta: Session six

Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
Thursday, 21 November 2019 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
OCHS Library

These reading sessions are intended for students who have an intermediate knowledge of Sanskrit and are interested in Vedānta texts. This term we will be reading Bhāskara’s commentary on the Brahma-sūtras. Bhāskara was a bhedābheda (‘difference-and-nondifference’) theologian and early critic of Śaṅkara’s Advaita Vedānta whose ideas strongly influenced the early history of Vedānta.

How did unmarried women live in the Ṛg-vedic age?

Lectures of the Shivdasani Visiting Fellow
Prof. Mau Das Gupta
Thursday, 21 November 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
OCHS Library

The unmarried women of the Ṛg-vedic age longed primarily for conjugal love and the security provided by a heroic husband and a number of male offspring. This talk will focus on the literature of Apālā and Ghoṣā to understand the position of unmarried women in the Ṛg-vedic age. Both these women were afflicted with skin disease and remained unmarried in their father’s home. Apālā, the seer of ṚV 8.91, according to traditional sources, was infected with a cutaneous disease, which made it difficult for her to find a suitor. She was delighted when Indra drank soma-juice from her mouth.

Prof. Mau Das Gupta is Professor in Sanskrit at Calcutta University. She was awarded the prestigious Eashan Scholarship and the University gold medal along with many other prizes for her outstanding results in graduate and post-graduate examinations of the University of Calcutta. She did her PhD at Jadavpur University. She is an Associate Professor of Sanskrit in the University of Calcutta and was head, Department of Sanskrit till January 2016. A Vedic scholar, Das Gupta has interests in various other fields of literature. A poetess herself, she is also known for writing on various issues concerning Sanskrit and Bengali literature. She is a Sahitya Akademi Awardee (2015) for her translation of Hazari Prasad Dwivedi’s Anamdas ka Potha (2012) into Bengali.

Sanskrit Prelims I: Session six

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Friday, 22 November 2019 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper of the Theology and Religion Faculty in Elementary Sanskrit. A range of relevant Hindu and Buddhist texts will be chosen for translation and philological comment. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology and Religion to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary and its importance for the exegesis of Sanskrit texts. Students will learn to appreciate the interpretative nature of translation as a central discipline for the study of religions.
By the end of the course students will have gained a basic competency in translating classical Sanskrit and reading relevant passages from texts such as the Chāndogya Upaniṣad, the Bhagavadgītā and the Buddhist Heart Sūtra. The course book will be Walter Maurer’s The Sanskrit Language. Sanskrit Prelims continues throughout Michaelmas and Hilary Terms and for the first four weeks of Trinity.

Hinduism: Sources and Formations: Session six

Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
Friday, 22 November 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Faculty of Theology & Religion, Gibson Lecture Room

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and development of Hindu traditions from their early formation to the medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upaniṣads and Bhagavad Gītā, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Readings in the Netratantra: Session six

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Friday, 22 November 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
OCHS Library

The Netratantra is an important early medieval Śaiva/Śākta tantric text in Kashmir and Nepal, dating from around the early ninth century, and widely disseminated during the eleventh and probably tenth centuries. The text is a ‘universal’ (sarvasāmānya-) tantra, which overrides the distinctions between various tantric traditions and branches (e.g. between the Mantramārga and Kulamārga).

This term we will continue our reading of the Netratantra and discuss chapter seven on the subtle visualising meditation (sūkṣmadhyāna) based on the oldest available manuscript found in the National Archives of Kathmandu (NAK). In our translation of the text we will refer to and compare with other Nepalese manuscripts as well as the published edition in the Kashmir Series of Texts and Studies (KSTS). Apart from reading the text we will discuss its meaning from the perspective of the history of religions with an emphasis on models of the human in tantric Hinduism.

Sanskrit Prelims I: Session seven

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Monday, 25 November 2019 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper of the Theology and Religion Faculty in Elementary Sanskrit. A range of relevant Hindu and Buddhist texts will be chosen for translation and philological comment. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology and Religion to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary and its importance for the exegesis of Sanskrit texts. Students will learn to appreciate the interpretative nature of translation as a central discipline for the study of religions.
By the end of the course students will have gained a basic competency in translating classical Sanskrit and reading relevant passages from texts such as the Chāndogya Upaniṣad, the Bhagavadgītā and the Buddhist Heart Sūtra. The course book will be Walter Maurer’s The Sanskrit Language. Sanskrit Prelims continues throughout Michaelmas and Hilary Terms and for the first four weeks of Trinity.

Pāli for Sanskritists: Session seven

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Monday, 25 November 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Pāli Buddhist texts for students with prior knowledge of Sanskrit (e.g. Sanskrit Prelims). We will read classical Theravāda Buddhist discourses from the Pāli Canon such as the Fire Sermon (Ādittapariyāya-sutta) and Dependent Origination (Paṭiccasamuppāda) providing an easy philological introduction to the Pāli language via Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce to the essentials of Pali grammar and vocabulary with a focus on key terms and their importance for the exegesis of Buddhist texts. The course will contribute to an appreciation of the interpretative nature of translation as a central discipline for the study of religions. The course book will be Dines Andersen’s A Pāli Reader supplementet with Rune E.A. Johansson’s Pali Buddhist Texts: An Introductory Reader and Grammar.

Readings in Vedānta: Bhedābheda Vedānta: Session seven

Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
Thursday, 28 November 2019 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
OCHS Library

These reading sessions are intended for students who have an intermediate knowledge of Sanskrit and are interested in Vedānta texts. This term we will be reading Bhāskara’s commentary on the Brahma-sūtras. Bhāskara was a bhedābheda (‘difference-and-nondifference’) theologian and early critic of Śaṅkara’s Advaita Vedānta whose ideas strongly influenced the early history of Vedānta.

Sanskrit Prelims I: Session seven

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Friday, 29 November 2019 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper of the Theology and Religion Faculty in Elementary Sanskrit. A range of relevant Hindu and Buddhist texts will be chosen for translation and philological comment. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology and Religion to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary and its importance for the exegesis of Sanskrit texts. Students will learn to appreciate the interpretative nature of translation as a central discipline for the study of religions.
By the end of the course students will have gained a basic competency in translating classical Sanskrit and reading relevant passages from texts such as the Chāndogya Upaniṣad, the Bhagavadgītā and the Buddhist Heart Sūtra. The course book will be Walter Maurer’s The Sanskrit Language. Sanskrit Prelims continues throughout Michaelmas and Hilary Terms and for the first four weeks of Trinity.

Hinduism: Sources and Formations: Session seven

Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
Friday, 29 November 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Faculty of Theology & Religion, Gibson Lecture Room

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and development of Hindu traditions from their early formation to the medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upaniṣads and Bhagavad Gītā, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Readings in the Netratantra: Session seven

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Friday, 29 November 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
OCHS Library

The Netratantra is an important early medieval Śaiva/Śākta tantric text in Kashmir and Nepal, dating from around the early ninth century, and widely disseminated during the eleventh and probably tenth centuries. The text is a ‘universal’ (sarvasāmānya-) tantra, which overrides the distinctions between various tantric traditions and branches (e.g. between the Mantramārga and Kulamārga).

This term we will continue our reading of the Netratantra and discuss chapter seven on the subtle visualising meditation (sūkṣmadhyāna) based on the oldest available manuscript found in the National Archives of Kathmandu (NAK). In our translation of the text we will refer to and compare with other Nepalese manuscripts as well as the published edition in the Kashmir Series of Texts and Studies (KSTS). Apart from reading the text we will discuss its meaning from the perspective of the history of religions with an emphasis on models of the human in tantric Hinduism.

Sanskrit Prelims I: Session eight

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Monday, 2 December 2019 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper of the Theology and Religion Faculty in Elementary Sanskrit. A range of relevant Hindu and Buddhist texts will be chosen for translation and philological comment. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology and Religion to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary and its importance for the exegesis of Sanskrit texts. Students will learn to appreciate the interpretative nature of translation as a central discipline for the study of religions.
By the end of the course students will have gained a basic competency in translating classical Sanskrit and reading relevant passages from texts such as the Chāndogya Upaniṣad, the Bhagavadgītā and the Buddhist Heart Sūtra. The course book will be Walter Maurer’s The Sanskrit Language. Sanskrit Prelims continues throughout Michaelmas and Hilary Terms and for the first four weeks of Trinity.

Pāli for Sanskritists: Session eight

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Monday, 2 December 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Pāli Buddhist texts for students with prior knowledge of Sanskrit (e.g. Sanskrit Prelims). We will read classical Theravāda Buddhist discourses from the Pāli Canon such as the Fire Sermon (Ādittapariyāya-sutta) and Dependent Origination (Paṭiccasamuppāda) providing an easy philological introduction to the Pāli language via Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce to the essentials of Pali grammar and vocabulary with a focus on key terms and their importance for the exegesis of Buddhist texts. The course will contribute to an appreciation of the interpretative nature of translation as a central discipline for the study of religions. The course book will be Dines Andersen’s A Pāli Reader supplementet with Rune E.A. Johansson’s Pali Buddhist Texts: An Introductory Reader and Grammar.

Readings in Vedānta: Bhedābheda Vedānta: Session eight

Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
Thursday, 5 December 2019 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
OCHS Library

These reading sessions are intended for students who have an intermediate knowledge of Sanskrit and are interested in Vedānta texts. This term we will be reading Bhāskara’s commentary on the Brahma-sūtras. Bhāskara was a bhedābheda (‘difference-and-nondifference’) theologian and early critic of Śaṅkara’s Advaita Vedānta whose ideas strongly influenced the early history of Vedānta.

Theorizing the interaction between textual tradition and contemporary practices in Hindu studies

Lectures of the J.P. And Beena Khaitan Visiting Fellow
Thursday, 5 December 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
OCHS Library

A key problem, not only of Hindu studies but of the Comparative Study of Religion in general, is the relationship between the representations or ‘worldviews’ expressed in religious texts, and the experiences, practices and interpretations of actual practitioners. Using examples from research on the Sanskrit Devīmāhātmya in a site-specific context, this lecture will address theoretical and methodological questions central to Hindu Studies such as how (and why) to combine philological and ethnographic methods, how to understand the overlap or lack of overlap between the textual representations and the representations of religious practitioners, and how to theorize the relationship between textual semantics and embodied knowledge.

Silje Lyngar Einarsen is an Associate Professor at Oslo Metropolitan University and co-manager for the Śākta Traditions research programme at the OCHS. Her research is concerned with the relationship between Hindu scriptures and religious practice. She has conducted research on the role of Śākta texts and ritual performances during Navarātri in Benares, combining textual and ethnographic research methods. She is co-author on a Danish standard introduction to Hinduism with a focus on Varanasi (Systime, 2015) and is currently working on a Danish translation of the Haṭhapradīpikā. She has also published articles on the Navarātri festival and the Devīmāhātmya.

Sanskrit Prelims I: Session eight

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Friday, 6 December 2019 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
OCHS Library

The course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper of the Theology and Religion Faculty in Elementary Sanskrit. A range of relevant Hindu and Buddhist texts will be chosen for translation and philological comment. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology and Religion to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary and its importance for the exegesis of Sanskrit texts. Students will learn to appreciate the interpretative nature of translation as a central discipline for the study of religions.
By the end of the course students will have gained a basic competency in translating classical Sanskrit and reading relevant passages from texts such as the Chāndogya Upaniṣad, the Bhagavadgītā and the Buddhist Heart Sūtra. The course book will be Walter Maurer’s The Sanskrit Language. Sanskrit Prelims continues throughout Michaelmas and Hilary Terms and for the first four weeks of Trinity.

Hinduism: Sources and Formations: Session eight

Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
Friday, 6 December 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Faculty of Theology & Religion, Gibson Lecture Room

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and development of Hindu traditions from their early formation to the medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upaniṣads and Bhagavad Gītā, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Readings in the Netratantra: Session eight

Dr Bjarne Wernicke-Olesen
Friday, 6 December 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
OCHS Library

The Netratantra is an important early medieval Śaiva/Śākta tantric text in Kashmir and Nepal, dating from around the early ninth century, and widely disseminated during the eleventh and probably tenth centuries. The text is a ‘universal’ (sarvasāmānya-) tantra, which overrides the distinctions between various tantric traditions and branches (e.g. between the Mantramārga and Kulamārga).

This term we will continue our reading of the Netratantra and discuss chapter seven on the subtle visualising meditation (sūkṣmadhyāna) based on the oldest available manuscript found in the National Archives of Kathmandu (NAK). In our translation of the text we will refer to and compare with other Nepalese manuscripts as well as the published edition in the Kashmir Series of Texts and Studies (KSTS). Apart from reading the text we will discuss its meaning from the perspective of the history of religions with an emphasis on models of the human in tantric Hinduism.